What is magnetic induction? | magnetism & matter class 12

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Magnetic induction, magnetism & matter class 12

In this short piece of article, we will discuss magnetic induction which is the topic of chapter magnetism and matter of class 12. So let’s get started… [latexpage]

Let us suppose that a toroidal solenoid is wound around an iron ring. And It is placed in any external magnetic field $B_0$. We know that when a magnetic material is placed in an external magnetic field, magnetism is induced in it. It is important for us to know that how this magnetization occurred.

When a magnetic material is placed in an external magnetic field. Under the influence of this magnetizing field, $B_0$ magnetic moment of atomic current loops of the magnetic material tries to align itself along or against the magnetizing field $B_0$. Due to this, a net current develops on the surface of the magnetic material that’s called magnetization surface current $I_M$.

What is magnetic induction? | magnetism & matter class 12
Fig. 1, a). The wire is bound to the ring. b). Magnetizing surface current.

This magnetizing surface current indices magnetic field $B_M$ to the material which is given by $$B_M = \mu nI_{M}$$

Magnetic induction definition class 12

So we have seen that if a toroidal solenoid is bound around a magnetic material such as a ring and if it is placed in any external magnetizing field $B_0$ then magnetizing surface current induces a magnetic field to the material due to this the total magnetic field inside the magnetic material increases.

Definition – The total magnetic field inside a magnetic material is the sum of magnetising field and the additional magnetic field which is produced due to magnetisation of the material and is magnetic induction $\vec{B}$.

The magnetic induction can also be defined as the total number of magnetic field lines crossing per unit area normal through the magnetic material.

Suggested reading:

SI unit of magnetic induction

The SI unit of magnetic induction is Tesla (T) or Weber per metre square $(Wb m^{-2})$ which is equivalent to $Nm^{-1}A^{-1}$ or $JA^{-1}m^{-2}$

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