Preposition – definition, types, and examples

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Prepositions tell us where or when something is concerning something else. 

Preposition - definition, types, and examples
Preposition, source: dreamstime.com

Prepositions show the relationship of a noun, a pronoun, or a noun phrase with other words in a sentence. It often tells us where one noun is concerning another (e.g., The coffee is on the table beside you). But they can also indicate more abstract ideas, such as purpose or contrast (e.g., We went for a walk despite the rain).

Examples-

  • Meet me at the cinema hall.
  • Sukant is travelling to Jodpur with Rama.
  • We fell into the swimming pool.
  • The cat was sitting on the study table.
  • She can stand at least 5 mins under the water.
  • She was standing behind the teacher.
  • India was fighting against Pakistan.
  • We went for dinner with our friends.
  • My house is between the bank and the shop.
  • Your grade is below average.
  • We are very hungry but have nothing to eat.
  • I always go to the office by bus.
  • Besides, it’s still early for me.
  • Is the coffee too cold for you?
  • The window is above the radiator.
  • There’s a bird nest outside my house.

Note: In the above sentences, the preposition has been highlighted.

Types of Prepositions

Prepositions indicate direction, time, location, and spatial relationships, as well as other abstract types of relationships.

Direction: Look to the right and you’ll find your destination.

Time: She has been sleeping since this morning.

Location: We saw a movie at the theater.

Space: The cat hides under the table.

Here are some examples of Prepositions 

Tragically, there are no solid tricks for figuring out which preposition word to use with a specific blend of words. The most ideal way to study which preposition goes with which words are to peruse as much top-notch composition as possible and focus on which pairs sound right. The following are a couple of instances of the most well-known preposition utilized in sentences.

  • We’re cooking for ten guests tonight.
  • Dan ate lunch with his boss.
  • I feel sad without you.
  • They had a discussion about the match.
  • Nobody came to the party except John and Maira.

Read Also

Ending a Sentence with a Preposition

The old case that it’s inappropriate to end a sentence with a preposition has been completely exposed. It’s false and it never was valid. Most writers who generally demand that a preposition can’t end a sentence frequently end up with unnatural and unnatural sentences:

  • There’s no one else behind whom to hide. (Grammatically correct, but unnatural)
  • Where did you come from? (Grammatically correct and natural)
  • From where did you come? (Grammatically correct, but unnatural)

That said, it is sometimes more elegant to move a preposition to an earlier spot in a sentence, especially in very serious and formal writing. But if you do move the preposition, remember to delete it from the end.

  • This is something we must think about.
  • This is something which we must think on.
  • Facts about Preposition
    • Prepositions indicate relationships between other words in a sentence.
    • Many prepositions tell you where something is or when something happened.
    • Most prepositions have several definitions, so the meaning changes quite a bit in different contexts.
    • Ending a sentence with a preposition is not a grammatical error.

Verbs vs. prepositions

Some verbs have become prepositions.

Below are a few examples:

  • They have many helpers, including Mary.
  • According to Google Maps, we are at the right destination.
  • He went to the hospital following the fight.

The main difference between verbs and prepositions is that verbs have a subject. Even if the subject is not written, you can understand what it is. Prepositions do not have a subject.

Stay tuned with Laws Of Nature for more useful grammar articles.

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